Belly Button Biodiversity

March 1, 2014

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EFE a group of researchers from seven universities in the United States has found more than 2,300 species of bacteria by analyzing 60 samples. Medium navel hosts about 50 species and between different navels we find thousands of species, said the head of the Studio. A group of researchers from seven universities in the United States has found more than 2,300 species of bacteria by analyzing 60 samples taken from human navels, according to a study published in the journal PlosOne. The bacteria, according to scientists, differed more than expected. To study the navels we saw a disturbing immense richness of life, medium navel staying around 50 species and among different navels are thousands of species, writes in the magazine Scientific American biologist at the State University of Carolina of the North (USA) Rob Dunn, who has led the study.

Navels I remembered a tropical forest, explained Dunn, by correspondence with the so-called oligarchic ecology hypothesis. According to the hypothesis, in the jungles there are a variety of tree species, but there are a number of species, known as oligarchs, who are present in the majority of forests and are more common there. Navel would also have its oligarchs, because only eight bacteria were present in more than 70% of the samples taken in the study, and almost half of all bacteria were found in the samples are those eight species. Thus the most frequent bacteria tend to be the most abundant, but none of the more than 2,300 species found in all navels. The researchers also highlight the finding, for the first time in the human skin of three species of Archaea, microorganisms that normally live in extreme as geysers or acid water environments; two of these three species were found in the navel of a man who claimed to have not bathed in quite a few years. They conclude that it is still difficult to predict which species of bacteria can be found in a human being in particular, predict which species are most frequent (or rare) seems easier, at least for those species that live in navels.

The study is part of the Belly Button Biodiversity (BBB) project – biodiversity of navel-, an initiative of the State University and Museum of natural sciences of North Carolina (USA), which aims to explore and publicize the microbial jungle that we all carry on the skin. They are studying the navel as example of the biodiversity of the skin because the birth mark is a haven safer – more isolated and where surely less rub in the shower-for microbes. Microbes which, as you recall from the BBB, are mostly not bad. See more: human navel is home to more than 2,300 kinds of different bacteria, according to a study